What a cute idea!  So what do they call it, the math-lover’s cutting board? The nerdy chef cutting board? The engineer’s cutting board?  Nope, they had to ruin it with ableism:
The OCD Chef Cutting Board.  Don’t worry, being a little OCD in the kitchen isn’t really a bad thing.  Cutting everything up exactly the same size means it all cooks more evenly.  Your neurosis actually makes you a better chef.  Sometimes it’s good to be a little crazy.
Um… Seriously, no.  Just don’t.  OCD isn’t cute and innocent, it’s potentially debilitating, and it’s not your issue to appropriate.
(via OCD Chef Cutting Board)

What a cute idea!  So what do they call it, the math-lover’s cutting board? The nerdy chef cutting board? The engineer’s cutting board?  Nope, they had to ruin it with ableism:

The OCD Chef Cutting Board.  Don’t worry, being a little OCD in the kitchen isn’t really a bad thing.  Cutting everything up exactly the same size means it all cooks more evenly.  Your neurosis actually makes you a better chef.  Sometimes it’s good to be a little crazy.

Um… Seriously, no.  Just don’t.  OCD isn’t cute and innocent, it’s potentially debilitating, and it’s not your issue to appropriate.

(via OCD Chef Cutting Board)

Not all people have the “standard model” brain, and a lot of those people are proud atheists and need the support of a freethinking community. But many atheists pride themselves on being “more intelligent” than religious people, and are quick to call fundamentalists “crazy”.

Click the link to read the whole thing.

Ableism in Atheism Anonymous #3

Crossposted from Naturalistic Neurodiversity.

Do you consider yourself to be a person with a disability?

Psychological disability due to schizoaffective disorder (schizophrenia +major depressive disorder), Tourette’sGAD, and OCD.

Have you (or do you personally know someone who has) felt out-of-place or limited your involvement with an atheist community because of disability-related situations?

No.

What steps could atheist communities take to become more inclusive?

Make more educational videos, because I think a lot of people would rather watch a video than read a blog or article.  If there’s entertainment in it for them, they will be more receptive to the message.

Any other thoughts about ableism and atheism?

I have actually found that atheist/secular communities are far more inclusive to people with mental illnesses than religious communities, although I can’t really speak for how atheist/secular groups treat individuals with other disabilities, as my disabilities are “invisible.”

Response #3 from the Ableism in Atheism survey.

Ableism in Atheism Anonymous #30

Cross-posted from Naturalistic Neurodiversity.

Do you consider yourself to be a person with a disability?

I am mentally disordered and disabled: Obsessive Compulsive DisorderSchizoid Personality Disorder, ADD, and sensory processing/integration problems.

I also have motor dysgraphia, which is a minor physical impairment.

Have you (or do you personally know someone who has) felt out-of-place or limited your involvement with an atheist community because of disability-related situations?

Inappropriate treatment of/reactions to my service dog; assumptions about my comfort level with physical contact.

What steps could atheist communities take to become more inclusive?

It would be really great if people could be more educated about service dogs and rules about talking to/petting/feeding them (don’t do any of the above, ever.) ADA-compliant facilities would also be nice; going out is hard enough without being entry challenged because I don’t “look disabled.”

It’s even worse when other people in the group say that.

Any other thoughts about ableism and atheism?

Mental disabiliities are often invisible, but it doesn’t make them any less disabling.

The above has been response #30 from the Ableism in Atheism survey.